About the Growth tab

Growth Rates: The growth rates shown in the top table are calculated using the CAGR (compound annual growth rate) method. Fiscal year values are used to compare year to year data. 

Charts: The charts are showing TTM (trailing twelve month) quarterly data. Meaning, each point in the chart is the TTM value for the given data item at the quarterly period end date. The percent change shown on the chart is the absolute percent change for the given data item from the beginning of the chart to the latest value (unless a custom time-frame is selected).

Revenue: Total revenue from the income statement. Revenue is the amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned merchandise. It is the "top line" or "gross income" figure from which costs are subtracted to determine net income.

EBITDA: EBITDA stands for earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization. EBITDA is one indicator of a company's financial performance and is used as a proxy for the earning potential of a business, although doing so has its drawbacks. Further, EBITDA strips out the cost of debt capital and its tax effects by adding back interest and taxes to earnings.

EBITDA: EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) is one indicator of a company's financial performance and is used as a proxy for the earning potential of a business, although doing so has its drawbacks. Further, EBITDA strips out the cost of debt capital and its tax effects by adding back interest and taxes to earnings.

EBIT : EBIT (earnings before interest and taxes) measures the profit a company generates from its operations, making it synonymous with "operating profit." By ignoring tax and interest expenses, it focuses solely on a company's ability to generate earnings from operations, ignoring variables such as the tax burden and capital structure. This focus makes EBIT an especially useful metric for certain applications.

Net Income: Net income (NI) is a company's total earnings (or profit); net income is calculated by taking revenues and subtracting the costs of doing business such as depreciation, interest, taxes and other expenses. This number appears on a company's income statement and is an important measure of how profitable the company is over a period of time.

EPS (Diluted): Diluted EPS is a performance metric used to gauge the quality of a company's earnings per share (EPS) if all convertible securities were exercised. Convertible securities are all outstanding convertible preferred shares, convertible debentures, stock options (primarily employee-based) and warrants.

Book Value / Share: Book value per share is the per share value of a company based on the common shareholders' equity in the company. If a company were to dissolve, the book value per share is the value remaining for common shareholders after all assets are liquidated and all debt is paid.

Free Cash Flow: Free Cash Flow To Firm is the amount of cash flow from operations available for distribution after depreciation, working capital, taxes and investments are paid. FCF basically represents a company's profitability after all expenses and reinvestments. We use Aswath Damadaran’s description of Free Cash Flow to Firm which is calculated as: Free Cash Flow to Firm = NOPAT – Change in Invested Capital. NOPAT = EBIT * (1-tax rate). Change In Invested Capital = Ending Invested Capital – Beginning Invested Capital. Investing Capital = Net Operating Assets = Operating Assets – Operating Liabilities 

Fully Diluted Shares: The weighted average of diluted outstanding shares is a calculation that incorporates any changes in the amount of outstanding shares over a reporting period. Diluted shares outstanding includes all shares that would be created upon conversion into shares. Convertible securities are all outstanding convertible preferred shares, convertible debentures, stock options (primarily employee-based) and warrants.